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beginning_java_objects thread: Ivor Horton's "Beginning Java 2"


Message #1 by "Stanley Dominski" <dominskis@a...> on Sun, 9 Jun 2002 03:43:24
Dear Jacquie Barker,
 I am a high school computer science teacher and have been studying your 
text "Beginning Java 2 jdk 1.3 and Jacquie Barker's text "Beginning Java 
Objects". I am writing tests for each of the chapters. Accountability in 
the schools is a required part. I was thinking about perhaps the best way 
to begin is to intertwine the chapters of the two texts. Perhaps the best 
way for the students to absorb the material is to do the chapters in the 
following order

Part 1 The ABC's of Objects
 1) A Little taste of Java
 2) Abstraction and Modeling
 3) Objects and Modeling
 4) Object Interactions
 5) Relationships between Objects
 6) Collections of Objects
 7) Some Final Concepts

Part 2 Struction and Function of Java
 1) Introducing Java
 2) Programs, Data Variables and Calculations
 3) Loops and Logic
 4) Arrays and Strings
 5) Defining Classes
 6) Extendiing Classes and Inheritance
 
Part 3 Object Modeling
  8) The Object Modeling Process in a Nutshell
  9) Formalizing the Requirements through Use Cases
  10) Modeling the Static / Data Aspects of the System
  11) Modeling the Dynamic / Behavioral Aspects fo teh System

Part 4 More Advanced Concepts
  7) Exceptions
  8) Streams, Files and Stream Output
  9) Stream Input and Object Streams
  10) Utility Classes
  12) Creating Windows
  13) Handling Events
  14) Drawing In a Window
  15) Extending the GUI

  I don't really know how many chapters there will be time to cover in a 
one year ( or one semester depending on the school) class.
Unfortunately the texts are not on the "approved list" for the schools in 
Texas, but could be, if the publisher contacted the Booklist Director for 
the Educational Agency for the State of Texas. (Contact below)

textbook adoption
LChavarr@t...
xxx xxx xxxx

I think a good idea would be a 5 volume set of Ivor's Beginning Java 2 and 
Jacquie Barker's Beginning Java Objects . An unbeatable combination for 
beginning computer science students.

Stan

PS Here is an article on heavy student backpacks
 
 
 Calif., N.J. weigh options to lighten students' backpacks
Children's back injuries spur lawmakers' actions
June 5, 2002 Posted: 11:52 AM EDT (1552 GMT)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
SACRAMENTO, Califonria (AP) -- Concerned that students who lug heavy 
backpacks will develop spinal problems, lawmakers in two states may go 
further than any others to try to reduce excess pounds. 

New Jersey lawmakers are weighing a bill that proposes setting maximum 
weight standards for textbooks, while a California measure would require 
school districts to figure out ways to reduce the weight. 

Other states have done studies of backpack weight and children's back 
pain, but none have passed legislation requiring schools to do something 
about it. 

The moves come as concerns about drugs and guns possibly hidden in student 
lockers have led many schools to remove lockers, forcing children to lug 
their textbooks around all day. 

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, backpack-related 
injuries send about 5,000 students a year to emergency rooms nationwide. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children carry no more than 
10 percent to 20 percent of their own body weight and that backpacks 
should typically weigh less than 15 pounds. 

Backpack facts: 
The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children carry backpacks 
weighing no more than 10 to 20 percent of their body weight. 

A study found 55 percent of fifth- through eighth-graders carry more than 
15 percent of their body weight on their back.

The California Medical Association says childhood is a key time for spinal 
growth, which could be altered by heavy backpacks.

Backpack-related injuries send about 5,000 students a year to emergency 
rooms, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

 But a study by a Simmons College professor in Boston recently found that 
55 percent of fifth- through eighth-graders studied were carrying more 
than 15 percent of their body weight on their back. 

Cally Weise, an eighth-grader at Westbourough Middle School in South San 
Francisco, said she almost fell down the stairs at her school because her 
backpack weighs so much. Weise, who weighs 92 pounds, carries a 21-pound 
backpack and a 14-pound saxophone case. 

"I see smaller kids at school and they walk bent over," she said during a 
recent news conference at California's Capitol. "When I run, it hurts my 
back." 

Some school districts have started to tackle the problem by coordinating 
homework assignments to lessen the load or by purchasing two sets of 
textbooks for their students -- one set to leave at home, and one set to 
use in class. 

The bill in front of California's Senate would require school boards to 
develop and distribute a voluntary survey to school districts to find 
creative, cost-effective options to reduce excess backpack weight. 

The California Medical Association supports the bill, a spokeswoman said, 
because childhood is a key time for spinal growth, which could be altered 
by heavy backpacks. 

Assemblyman Rod Pacheco said some textbook companies oppose his bill, but 
that he is "not trying to reduce the educational advancement of children." 

In New Jersey, Assemblyman Peter Barnes' proposal would direct the state 
Board of Education to set and enforce weight standards for elementary and 
secondary textbooks. 

"I was in the Army and these kids are carrying bigger backpacks than what 
we used to carry," said Barnes. "These kids are hunched over and are 
afraid to stand up straight because they might fall over." 
 


Message #2 by Jacquie Barker <jjbarker@e...> on Tue, 11 Jun 2002 06:10:29 -0400
Hello, Stan!  Please see my comments below.

Stanley Dominski wrote:

> Dear Jacquie Barker,
>  I am a high school computer science teacher and have been studying your
> text "Beginning Java 2 jdk 1.3 and Jacquie Barker's text "Beginning Java
> Objects". I am writing tests for each of the chapters. Accountability in
> the schools is a required part. I was thinking about perhaps the best way
> to begin is to intertwine the chapters of the two texts. Perhaps the best
> way for the students to absorb the material is to do the chapters in the
> following order

Both Ivor's and my books are intended to be beginning level books.  Ideally, mine would be
tackled in its entirety before Ivor's, because it gives a broader brush treatment to Java
and a deeper treatment of objects, and it is my opinion that one should understand objects
thoroughly before diving too deeply into any language.  But, regardless of which of the two
books someone starts with, there will be some overlap between the two, because both must,
of necessity, cover the basics of Java.

The way you've proposed to interleave them makes good sense ... I'd throw in my Chapter 16
on GUIs while you are at it.

>
>
> Part 1 The ABC's of Objects
>  1) A Little taste of Java
>  2) Abstraction and Modeling
>  3) Objects and Modeling
>  4) Object Interactions
>  5) Relationships between Objects
>  6) Collections of Objects
>  7) Some Final Concepts
>
> Part 2 Struction and Function of Java
>  1) Introducing Java
>  2) Programs, Data Variables and Calculations
>  3) Loops and Logic
>  4) Arrays and Strings
>  5) Defining Classes
>  6) Extendiing Classes and Inheritance
>
> Part 3 Object Modeling
>   8) The Object Modeling Process in a Nutshell
>   9) Formalizing the Requirements through Use Cases
>   10) Modeling the Static / Data Aspects of the System
>   11) Modeling the Dynamic / Behavioral Aspects fo teh System
>
> Part 4 More Advanced Concepts
>   7) Exceptions
>   8) Streams, Files and Stream Output
>   9) Stream Input and Object Streams
>   10) Utility Classes
>   12) Creating Windows
>   13) Handling Events
>   14) Drawing In a Window
>   15) Extending the GUI
>
>   I don't really know how many chapters there will be time to cover in a
> one year ( or one semester depending on the school) class.

Just to let you know, when I teach at the university level, I spend one semester teaching
parts I and II of my book, and a second semester teaching part III and beyond (my upcoming
sequel, Deploying Java Objects, will pick up where Beginning Java Objects leaves off, to
talk about deploying Java applications via the web, and will be the basis the second half
of my second semester course -- see my website, objectstart.com, for more details.)

>
> Unfortunately the texts are not on the "approved list" for the schools in
> Texas, but could be, if the publisher contacted the Booklist Director for
> the Educational Agency for the State of Texas. (Contact below)
>
> textbook adoption
> LChavarr@t...
> xxx xxx xxxx

Unfortunately, Wrox doesn't aggressively pursue educational institutions -- it is up to you
and me to be the book's advocate, and I greatly appreciate your role in this regard!  If
you are unable to convince them to adopt the books, will you be unable to use them?

> I think a good idea would be a 2 volume set of Ivor's Beginning Java 2 and
> Jacquie Barker's Beginning Java Objects . An unbeatable combination for
> beginning computer science students.


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