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c_sharp thread: C# vs VB in NET


Message #1 by "Mark Phillips" <margia@m...> on Fri, 12 Jan 2001 05:57:13 -0000
What is the advantage of using C# instead of VB in Net applications.  Is

it simply a matter of what language you already know. VB or C++.

Message #2 by "William E. Blum" <wblum@p...> on Thu, 11 Jan 2001 22:24:22 -0800
Yes, use the language you know best. Both C# and VB.net use the same

run-time library. The only difference is the syntax of the language you

choose. The actual byte-code that is generated is the same. Note, however,

that the syntax of VB.net has changed somewhat from that of VB6, so knowing

VB6 does not mean you know VB.net syntax. .NET is a whole new thing, which

you have to learn regardless of what language you knew before. Still, VB.net

is more like VB6 than it is like C++, so there is still an advantage to

using the BASIC syntax.



-----Original Message-----

From: Mark Phillips [mailto:margia@m...]

Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 9:57 PM

To: C # list

Subject: C# vs VB in NET





What is the advantage of using C# instead of VB in Net applications.  Is

it simply a matter of what language you already know. VB or C++.



Message #3 by "Stankevitz, Christian (CT)" <ctstankevitz@d...> on Fri, 12 Jan 2001 09:25:45 -0500
There is an advantage to using C# over VB.NET is that you can declare unsafe

code and access low level pointers, data structures, and external C and C++

API's that are necessary when writing some applications like software that

needs to communicate with hardware.



Christian



-----Original Message-----

From: William E. Blum [mailto:wblum@p...]

Sent: Friday, January 12, 2001 1:24 AM

To: C # list

Subject: RE: C# vs VB in NET





Yes, use the language you know best. Both C# and VB.net use the same

run-time library. The only difference is the syntax of the language you

choose. The actual byte-code that is generated is the same. Note, however,

that the syntax of VB.net has changed somewhat from that of VB6, so knowing

VB6 does not mean you know VB.net syntax. .NET is a whole new thing, which

you have to learn regardless of what language you knew before. Still, VB.net

is more like VB6 than it is like C++, so there is still an advantage to

using the BASIC syntax.



-----Original Message-----

From: Mark Phillips [mailto:margia@m...]

Sent: Thursday, January 11, 2001 9:57 PM

To: C # list

Subject: C# vs VB in NET





What is the advantage of using C# instead of VB in Net applications.  Is

it simply a matter of what language you already know. VB or C++.





Message #4 by Bri&Liz <brianh@s...> on Fri, 12 Jan 2001 17:33:12 -0500
The VB .NET is a more "refined" language. VB was always the odd man out 

with respect to variable as they were passed by reference as a default. Now 

the default is by value, so you are protected from inadvertently changing a 

global value. If you are a long time VB user, this is likely to make you a 

bit crazy at first, but it is the behavior of most other major languages. 

There are some other major changes in VS .NET of which you are likely aware 

(Web Forms for example).



C# is, depending on whether you already know Java or not, a way cool 

language. If you have avoided C++ due to complexities of multiple pointers, 

confusing syntax, lack of a "true" object oriented syntax, please dive into 

C#. It is a better Java than Java and it is a better C language than C++.



Brian



At 10:24 PM 1/11/2001 -0800, you wrote:

>Yes, use the language you know best. Both C# and VB.net use the same

>run-time library. The only difference is the syntax of the language you

>choose. The actual byte-code that is generated is the same. Note, however,

>that the syntax of VB.net has changed somewhat from that of VB6, so knowing

>VB6 does not mean you know VB.net syntax. .NET is a whole new thing, which

>you have to learn regardless of what language you knew before. Still, VB.net

>is more like VB6 than it is like C++, so there is still an advantage to

>using the BASIC syntax.



Message #5 by "Mark Phillips" <margia@m...> on Sat, 13 Jan 2001 06:33:03 -0000
Thanks Brian

Thanks William

Thanks Christian

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