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Old January 8th, 2016, 03:49 PM
Wilfred Desert Wilfred Desert is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmcpeak View Post
Well I'm late to the party, but I'll add my $0.02.



It must be a problem with the epub version. All of the examples have HTML5 doctypes, and there are no remnants of XHTML DTDs in the physical book.

As to the actual issue in Ch9 Ex5, it (and me, apparently) falls prey to CSS specificity. IDs have a higher specificity than classes. So because I used the font property in the ID selector, it overrides font-style in the .new-style selector. As Moby found, the solution is to change the #divAdvert rule to:

Code:
#divAdvert {
    font-family: arial;
    font-size: 12pt;
}
Errata isn't abandoned; there's just only been one report for this edition. As mentioned, errata is reported using a separate from (http://wrox.custhelp.com/app/ask). The submissions are processed and sent to the authors for verification. I don't know how long it takes for an errata submission to reach me, but it will.

Unfortunately, every book has errors. With the size and scope of such a large project, bugs are inevitable... even with the author and several editors. This edition was a huge reorganization from prior editions, and remarkably very little has been reported.



Projects. Think of something you want to build and build it, but it's important to pick realistic projects. Start with something manageable, and as you gain confidence, build more complex projects.



Using jQuery is fine. It's a tool that, when used correctly, can make you more productive. But it is also JavaScript, so be sure and have a solid understanding of the language and its behavior.
Thank you very much for answering. I shouldn't have used the word "abandoned". That was too emotional. But it was mostly due to the fact that your book is my personal favourite. Many people recommend "Eloquent Javascript" to be the best fit for beginners whereas I disagree on that. "Beginning Javascript" is much more structured and reader-friendly.

As for jQuery, do you think that it's necessary to understand how what you do using jQuery can be done using vanilla Javascript?
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