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-   BOOK: Access 2007 VBA Programmer's Reference ISBN: 978-0-470-04703-3 (http://p2p.wrox.com/forumdisplay.php?f=329)
-   -   ADO vs. DAO (http://p2p.wrox.com/showthread.php?t=80912)

mtranchi September 14th, 2010 03:21 AM

ADO vs. DAO
 
Hi all,
Just got the 2010 version of this book, and on pg. 356 it says the latest version of DAO is 14.0, which ships with Office 2010. Yet when I look in references in the VBE, the only reference i have is to DAO 3.6. Is this errata or is something amiss with my installation, etc?

Also, some sites say DAO is either obsolete or going to be deprecated. Yet this book says it has grown in popularity (my last version of Access was 2000, so I'm like 10 years behind the times). Since I'm new to DAO and ADO, any advice on which i should learn first?

Any help will be appreciated.

gjgriffith January 20th, 2011 09:50 PM

ADO vs. DAO
 
Hello mtranchi,

I saw your posts here and wanted to say thanks for sending your questions and comments over to us. It looks like you have several questions here, so I want to reply to each individually:
  1. You said: "Just got the 2010 version of this book, and on pg. 356 it says the latest version of DAO is 14.0, which ships with Office 2010. Yet when I look in references in the VBE, the only reference i have is to DAO 3.6. Is this errata or is something amiss with my installation, etc?"

    Actually, sorry to ask you to do this, but since this question is about the Access 2010 book, can you post this question in this forum:
    http://p2p.wrox.com/book-access-2010...reference-597/
    <br />
  2. You said: "Also, some sites say DAO is either obsolete or going to be deprecated."

    Well, there are always a lot of rumors out there and please don't believe everything you read about Access, unless is it an official announcement from Microsoft. DAO has not been deprecated in Access 2007 or Access 2010, and in fact, has been updated in both cases. As of now, you should still be safe to use DAO.
    <br />
  3. You said: "Yet this book says it has grown in popularity (my last version of Access was 2000, so I'm like 10 years behind the times)."

    DAO was part of the Access 2000 release (although the default reference was set to ADO, which was a change from 97). DAO is still included with Access, has had updates since 2000, is very popular these days to access data.
    <br />
  4. You said: "Since I'm new to DAO and ADO, any advice on which i should learn first?"

    Hmm, that is a tough question and there is much debate over this particular topic. It has been my experience, when developers advocate one library over the other, it is typically for some small feature that is not supported by the other library that is specific to their task. But overall, you can accomplish most data related tasks with either library. I think a lot of developers who start in Access (i.e. haven't programmed in other languages before), start with DAO and then move on to ADO. However, some developers start in other languages, such as .NET or ASP, and may already have some knowledge and experience with ADO, so they are more familiar with it and choose ADO over DAO. Overall, you can accomplish most data related tasks with both, although each has it's own unique features not found in the other. Also, DAO is native to Access and there are lots of different development environments that support some form of ADO. So really, the choice is up to you, but in my very humble opinion, it is probably easiest to start in DAO and move to ADO if you haven't had any experience with either previously, just because it is the default in Access 2007.
<br />
Anyway, I hope this has helped and answered all of your questions, but if you need anything else here, please feel free to reply to this thread and I will do what I can to help out! And thanks again for your posts, we really appreciate your patronage!

Sincerely,
Geoffrey L. Griffith
http://www.ImagineThought.com


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