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Old December 4th, 2003, 07:24 PM
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Ben,
It's not just the look of the switchboard that I hate, it's the fact that it's quite cumbersome, and only allows for certain functions to be run. Sure, you can have the "Run Code" function do some of your own code, but it's usually not worth the bother as far as I'm concerned.
Besides, I'd rather make something from scratch I KNOW works, and does EXACTLY what I want, rather than make a compromise for the sake of 2 minutes worth of saving time by using a wizard, then having to go and change the code for it anyway.

I am a loud man with a very large hat. This means I am in charge
 
Old December 5th, 2003, 11:44 AM
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That's what macros are for. You can use Access macros to define commands to open database objects like data access pages, tables, etc. Just because you can only run certain functions on a switchboard doesn't mean that you can't increase the functionality of the switchboard by using macros. Trust me on this. I've used macros in my own personal database as well as databases that I've worked on for my Advanced Access course

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Steven
 Ben,
It's not just the look of the switchboard that I hate, it's the fact that it's quite cumbersome, and only allows for certain functions to be run. Sure, you can have the "Run Code" function do some of your own code, but it's usually not worth the bother as far as I'm concerned.
Besides, I'd rather make something from scratch I KNOW works, and does EXACTLY what I want, rather than make a compromise for the sake of 2 minutes worth of saving time by using a wizard, then having to go and change the code for it anyway.

I am a loud man with a very large hat. This means I am in charge
Ben Horne
Madison Area Technical College student
-------------------------
http://community.webshots.com/user/valerian114

Go there. I have a lot of awesome photos that I rendered myself
 
Old December 5th, 2003, 12:12 PM
sal sal is offline
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Quote:
quote:Trust me on this. I've used macros in my own personal database as well as databases that I've worked on for my Advanced Access course
Quote:
No.
Trust me on this one! I have disagreed with many teachers in my school because they teach the features (creatures) of Ms Access. Sorry to saythis, but, teachers can teach, but they are not nescesarily all programmers. I have been working with Access since 1996 and I know the bugs.

Macros are evil. They hang and cause problems and use a lot of overhead. Macros where meant for MS Office users not coders, but, They cause too much trouble to help anyone. anyway, with the switchboard ir I have 10 different choices, I can not show all of them becaues it will only show 8 if I remember correctly. Oh, and how do you get back to the previous, that uses up one of 8, man, how di I get back to the start of switchboard, man it used up 2 of 8 now.

Learn to use the tree view. It is unlimited. Real life. Once you set-up your own switchboard you can make it available to all of your applications. You can even sell it to your customers (there is an idea).



Sal
 
Old December 5th, 2003, 12:15 PM
sal sal is offline
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Anyway, how can you say "Trust me on this", you are not sharing your application. Do you know what happens when you do that?

Please everyone reading this, learn Access limitations, not features. This will make you more aware of its true worth.



Sal
 
Old December 5th, 2003, 02:41 PM
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Macros & 'trust me' in the same paragraph! ACK!! NEVER trust macros!! They may work on your 'course' databases, and your personal, but go and design a database (many different versions of the same app) to be sold retail to Fortune 100 companies internationally, then come back and tell me how to trust macros.

You cannot do any efficient error handling with them.. They are for beginners as far as I'm concerned and I only have them for menu items in my custom menubars. Other than that, forget it. I hear people say they use macros because they don't know VBA. That is no longer an excuse since you can convert macros to modules within Access from the Tools menu option then step through the code and see what is going on within the converted macro.

Learn code and forget macros!

With warmest regards,

Beth M
 
Old December 5th, 2003, 05:18 PM
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Beth,

I hear ya. I've used quite a bit of Visual Basic for Applications code in Music Inventory 2001. Take this case study for an example: I wanted a custom splash screen form that would close automatically after 5 seconds and initialize my switchbboard. I feel it's only fair for me to say that I got the code for the form off of one of the forums here. I only use macros for the simple stuff (opening data access pages, etc). I'm not at all fond of converting macros to Visual Basic.

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by BethMoffitt
 Macros & 'trust me' in the same paragraph! ACK!! NEVER trust macros!! They may work on your 'course' databases, and your personal, but go and design a database (many different versions of the same app) to be sold retail to Fortune 100 companies internationally, then come back and tell me how to trust macros.

You cannot do any efficient error handling with them.. They are for beginners as far as I'm concerned and I only have them for menu items in my custom menubars. Other than that, forget it. I hear people say they use macros because they don't know VBA. That is no longer an excuse since you can convert macros to modules within Access from the Tools menu option then step through the code and see what is going on within the converted macro.

Learn code and forget macros!

With warmest regards,

Beth M
Ben Horne
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Old December 5th, 2003, 05:22 PM
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Ben wrote:
Quote:
quote:I'm not at all fond of converting macros to Visual Basic.
Why not?
 
Old December 6th, 2003, 12:26 AM
sal sal is offline
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It is not a matter of whether you are fond of something or not. It is a matter of what is the proper way to accomplish a task.




Sal
 
Old December 9th, 2003, 01:21 AM
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I must agree with Ben, I'm not fond of converting macros to VB - for the reason that VB (or, as I prefer to call it when referencing Visual Basic for Applications, "VBA") allows you to do much more, allows for better error checking, and isn't nearly as cumbersome


Honestly though - Sal and Beth are 100% right in their earlier comments, macros are the work of the devil - and should be avoided for all things unless there is absolutely no other option (menus being a case in point)

Macros aren't a thing to use because of any fondness or otherwise, you should use the right tool for the job - sure, you could use a screwdriver to get a nail into some wood, but a hammer would be better, and maybe even consider a nailgun

I am a loud man with a very large hat. This means I am in charge
 
Old January 6th, 2005, 06:50 PM
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In defense of Ben and building upon Steven's excellent analogy.

If you know how to use a hammer but don't know how to use a nailgun, then it's far better, in my opinion, to use that hammer effectively than to kill someone with a misfiring nailgun.

My point being that you use what works. I don't use macros in my code but my VBA skills are poor so that I tend to blow things up. I also use a Switchboard because it is a simple tool (the hammer) and I don't have time to develop something using VBA (the nailgun, in some instances, I actually found it far easier to use than macros).

As far as your error, damnnono, you'll have to look at the code and do some debugging if you want to track down what is wrong. Otherwise you might consider erasing your current switchboard and regenerating one (I'm not sure if it will overwrite the switchboard table, so you might want to make a copy of it to save your settings).





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