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BOOK: Beginning HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript
This is the forum to discuss the Wrox book Beginning HTML, XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript by Jon Duckett; ISBN: 978-0-470-54070-1
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Old March 21st, 2011, 08:45 AM
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Default Recommended reading

I've finished the CSS and XHTML portion of the book and found it very enlightening. Currently working on the Javascript portion.

Any recommendations as to what languages to put into the learning query after this? I was thinking of PHP.

Would also appreciate any recommendations on up-to-date books about Javascript (And other recommended languages) that are written in in the same style as this book. Assuming this book doesn't cover all the basics of javascript, that is.
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Old March 21st, 2011, 08:57 AM
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Hi - what to learn next kinda depends on what you want to do.

PHP is a good move. And if you want to build sites for other people, you might also like to look at something like WordPress - it helps you build quite powerful sites fairly quickly and easy (rather than building them from scratch). And there are lots of plugins from contact forms to calendars to extend its functionality.

This book only teaches enough JavaScript to get you going with the scripts you download off the web - and get a basic grasp of the language. The Wrox book by Paul Wilton (think it is called Beginning JavaScript) is pretty good if you want to learn more about JavaScript and start writing your own scripts.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 12:28 PM
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I would like to independently develop webpages for small companies on top of my current IT business.

Thanks for the tip on the beginning Javascript, seems like a good place to start. Any tips on good PHP books as well?

As for wordpress; will that not cause problems legality-wise if I start using their code to make money? I have no problem with building the framework myself, I find it interesting. I was planning on building a few 'templates' to work from when I've had some more training under my belt.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 01:36 PM
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Hi, I'm afraid I have not read any PHP books in quite a while, so I would not like to make any personal recommendations (although I do tend to use quite a few Wrox books - so I would probably have a look there for starters).

As far as WordPress goes, there are lots of people from freelancers to large digital agencies that build sites for clients on WordPress. On the bottom right of the WordPress.org home page you will see some of the people who use it - and a link to a showcase of sites built with it.

You don't have to charge for using the WordPress code; you are charging for the time it takes for you to understand your client's business needs, design the site, create templates that match your design, set up the site with their information, and show them how to update it. You can also charge an ongoing retainer for support / hosting / updating the site.

It takes so long to build a CMS as powerful and with so many features as WordPress (or Drupal, or Joomla), that you would save yourself a lot of time if you customised an existing open source project for standard types of websites. You also benefit from the community who update and create extra modules for it (rather than always having to implement new functionality yourself).

I'm not saying that you should not build you own CMS at some stage, rather that if you are looking for the next step to take after learning HTML + CSS, and want to create sites for clients, then you might find that learning to use something like WordPress allows you to build some very powerful and complex sites far quicker than you would be able to if you were writing your own CMS.

All the best!
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 01:46 PM
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I hadn't considered WordPress as an option at all but you make it sound rather attractive, I will look into this.

Thanks for your time!
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Old April 29th, 2011, 11:17 PM
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Smile stackoverflow.com

You've asked a good question. One that I'll probably be asking when I'm done with this book.

I hope I'm not breaking any rules, but there's a good website to ask questions like this. http://www.stackonverflow.com

It is a real nice community of developers who ask and answer all questions IT.

I've found it a good place to get advice from people with experience. They treat Newbies kindly and there is always someone around for these kind of questions.
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