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Old August 5th, 2004, 08:34 PM
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Default Page Breaks In Web Pages

Hi all,

Here's my problem: I would like to submit a Flash tutorial to the Tutorials section of Flash Kit. I am a complete noobee at this so I don't really know how best to go at it. My main concern is adding page breaks to an HTML document. How can I insert these from within Dreamweaver?

Thanks in advance,



Ben Horne
Madison Area Technical College - Truax
3550 Anderson Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53704-2599


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"There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who claim to be Flash junkies and those who actually are Flash junkies"
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Old August 6th, 2004, 12:59 AM
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You can take a look at the CSS page-break-before and page-break-after properties: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/page.h...ge-break-props

Take care not to overdo this. Usually it's much better to leave page breaking up to the client. For example, you may have a different size of print paper. If you force a break, I may end up with an almost empty sheet of paper with only one or two lines on it....

Why do you need the page break in the first place?

Imar
 
Old August 7th, 2004, 10:27 PM
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Imar,

Page breaks are suggested at the Flash Kit tutorial submission page for a good reason: To make the tutorials easier to follow, Flash Kit wants them to be split up into distinct sections by using page breaks.

http://www.flashkit.com/tutorials/tute_blank.php for more clarification

Thank You,



Ben Horne
Madison Area Technical College - Truax
3550 Anderson Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53704-2599


-------------------------
http://www.acidplanet.com/artist.asp?AID=290705

"There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who claim to be Flash junkies and those who actually are Flash junkies"
 
Old August 8th, 2004, 04:07 AM
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I think they are not referring to physical page breaks, when printed on paper, but to a "paged presentation" of the article.

I think when you use the <%BRK%> notation, you'll get a list of new HTML pages like 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next as on this page: http://www.flashkit.com/tutorials/In...in-9/index.php (random example)

This way, the article is easier to follow, because it's presented in pages. However, this has nothing to do with actual physical page breaks. If you use just a few <%BRK%> tags in a long article, you can end up with a "Flash Kit tutorial page" that spreads over more than one printed sheet of paper.

Does that make sense?

Imar
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Old August 8th, 2004, 03:06 PM
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I understand what you are trying to get at. However, I think if people wanted to refer to the tutorial later, they could just save it as a favorite on their MyFK page. I could see how printing the tutorials would work though.

Ben Horne
Madison Area Technical College - Truax
3550 Anderson Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53704-2599


-------------------------
http://www.acidplanet.com/artist.asp?AID=290705

"There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who claim to be Flash junkies and those who actually are Flash junkies"
 
Old August 8th, 2004, 04:04 PM
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I must admit I don't understand what *you* are trying to get at. What does "paged media" have to do with adding the page to your favorites?

I think the idea behind the instruction to spread an article over multiple pages is to avoid long running (and possibly boring) articles. By splitting them up over multiple "browser pages", its content becomes much easier to comprehend, because you aren't looking at the whole article at once, but rather get the content in bite-size chunks.

Another reason may be download time. Often from the first "page" of an article you can judge whether you want to read the rest or not. With a paged article, all you need to download is the first page.

What do you mean with "how printing the tutorials would work though"? You could still created "paged" articles that look like crap on a printer.....

Imar
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Everyone is unique, except for me.





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