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Old January 3rd, 2006, 11:02 AM
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Default Grid Architecture

In Oracle 10g, there is something called a grid architecture where we can add or remove capacity by adding small incremenets of resources like RAM.

Is there something similar in sql server or windows qhere we can share the resources for optimal usage ?

Thanks,
GibiJ.

 
Old January 3rd, 2006, 02:47 PM
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There is no GRID architecture for SQL Server.

On the Disk Storage side SQL Server can take advantage of Storage Area Networks (SANs).

In terms of distributed computer SQL Server does support Federated Servers, but implementing that requires some design changes to the database such as using Distributed Partitioned Views, and is definitely not a no brainer.

David Lundell
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Old January 4th, 2006, 02:06 AM
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Whats this cluster does ? This can only act as back up server ? It cannot be used as a shared server ?
Does windows have any such facility like grid?

 
Old January 5th, 2006, 03:06 AM
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Clustering is different than Federated Servers.

Clustering is a Windows and SQL feature, while you can configure what is referred to as an Active-Active cluster what that really means in Node 1 runs an instance of SQL Server supporting Applications A and B and Node 2 runs an instance of SQL Server supporting Applications C and D. However in the event of a failure of Node 1 or Node 2 the other node can take over all of the resources for the failed Node. Eg. if Node 1 fails, Node 2 takes over its instance of SQL Server (it starts it up as its own process), its virtual Name and virtual IP address, it also has to take over the disk resource (on a shared SCSI bus) where the databases for Apps A and B reside.

Windows does provide Network Load Balancing (NLB). However, NLB is used for middle tier business logic in COM+ components, and can't be used for SQL Server.

David Lundell
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www.mutuallybeneficial.com





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