Wrox Programmer Forums
|
Access Discussion of Microsoft Access database design and programming. See also the forums for Access ASP and Access VBA.
Welcome to the p2p.wrox.com Forums.

You are currently viewing the Access section of the Wrox Programmer to Programmer discussions. This is a community of software programmers and website developers including Wrox book authors and readers. New member registration was closed in 2019. New posts were shut off and the site was archived into this static format as of October 1, 2020. If you require technical support for a Wrox book please contact http://hub.wiley.com
 
Old February 12th, 2004, 10:02 AM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,151
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Send a message via ICQ to SerranoG Send a message via AIM to SerranoG
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by joefawcett
 According to my licence you can only distribute runtime files if you have bought a developer's copy of Access which comes with the appropriate files and deployment tools.
 Ah, well there you go. Joe and Sal are correct in that Runtime is free to distribute, but only when you spend mondo dollars to buy the Developer. People who don't have Developer cannot download Runtime for free. It has to be given to them by those have Developer.

Thanks for clearing that up. I was (wrongly) under the impression that Runtime could be downloaded by anyone for free.

Greg Serrano
Michigan Dept. of Environmental Quality, Air Quality Division
 
Old February 12th, 2004, 01:38 PM
sal sal is offline
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 702
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

It comes with the MSDN subscription. That costs only $2700.00 :(

It is a tax write off. (I do not like Write offs)



Sal
 
Old February 13th, 2004, 02:56 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 129
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Ben, I don't know what version of Access you are using. But the Developer Edition for Access 97, which includes a licence to distribute the runtime edition as frequently as you like so others without Access can use your programs, is often available on eBay at affordable prices. I got mine that way. Just be careful that you are getting a legit licenced version of course.


Clive Astley
 
Old February 14th, 2004, 12:42 AM
sal sal is offline
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 702
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Question. I have purchased the Universal MSDN subscription in the past. It is somewhere aroud $2700.00. I also knokw that this can be purchased at a university book store at an academic prize. Does anyone know if this will allow you to compile your .NET programs? The reason I ask is because if you are taking any classes in a community college or university, the prize is aroud $750.00 or $800.00. This subscription has every development tool made by Misrosoft.

Just keep this in mind if you are about to purchase MS Office and an Operating system. Just the OS and Office will cost around $600.00.

See this link:

http://www.microsoft.com/education/?...cademicPricing


Sal
 
Old February 16th, 2004, 03:23 PM
Authorized User
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 43
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Send a message via ICQ to bjackman Send a message via MSN to bjackman
Default

Just my 2 cents worth. The access runtime files are included with all versions of Office 2003. But to deliver them to your clients royalty free, you have to purchase the Developer extensions pack which is about 600 bux last time i checked. I have the developer extensions and when you package a file, you have to tell it where the filesare located so it can include them. ranted, i am still a novice at this and i'm still trying to tweak my install packages but i'm getting better all the time.

Branden

 
Old February 17th, 2004, 06:09 AM
Ben Ben is offline
Authorized User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 75
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Thanks to all for the clarification on this. I must admit I was surprised there was an extra cost, I thought there would be some differentiation between developers within a closed organisation and developers of a saleable application.
I've decided due to some required design objectives (and the extra cost), to build a VB FrontEnd/Access BackEnd instead. Anyone want to comment on DAO vs ADO
 
Old February 17th, 2004, 06:23 AM
joefawcett's Avatar
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,074
Thanks: 1
Thanked 38 Times in 37 Posts
Default

In my opinion unless you have an overwhelming reason do not use DAO over ADO. It's worse performing, worse across networks etc.

--

Joe
 
Old February 17th, 2004, 02:36 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 129
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

But isn't DAO "native" to VB? Wouldn't this make it more efficient than adding the extra ADO component?

Clive Astley
 
Old February 17th, 2004, 03:20 PM
Authorized User
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 75
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Clive,
  There are instances where it makes sense to use DAO and where it makes sense to ADO. When I'm manipulating querydef objects, I used DAO. I have found DAO to out perform ADO in this type of situation.

   When I'm pulling data from SQL Server, I user ADO recordsets.

   It it possible to have both ADO and DAO coexist within a given application. Hence the class qualification for the objects.

   Dim dbTemp as DAO.Database
   Dim rsTemp as DAO.Recordset
   Dim rsADOTemp as ADODB.Recordset

   If you don't use the class qualification, they system will attempt to find an object match with the libraries listed in the references area. For example, ff you think you are creating a DAO recordset and write the DAO code as such

   Set rsTemp = Currentdb.OpenRecordSet("Select * from tblEmps")

   and the ADO library appears above the DAO library, you wil get a compile error because the system is trying to match what you wrote against what an ADO recordset should look like according to the library. This what is would expect to see if it was ADO.

   set rsADO = CurrentProject.Connection.Execute("SELECT * FROM tblEmps")

   I hope I'm not rambling on too much...bottom line, make sure you qualify your objects with their respective class names and choose the best technology, ADO or DAO, for what you are tyring to accomplish.

Thanks,
Mike
 
Old February 18th, 2004, 04:35 AM
joefawcett's Avatar
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,074
Thanks: 1
Thanked 38 Times in 37 Posts
Default

Quote:
quote:Originally posted by Clive Astley
 But isn't DAO "native" to VB? Wouldn't this make it more efficient than adding the extra ADO component?

Clive Astley
No, neither are native to VB, they are both COM classes that can be used from VB or any other COM aware language, e.g. JScript.

--

Joe





Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Access ascx filename at runtime Crowknee .NET Framework 1.x 3 March 17th, 2008 08:00 PM
Redistributable Access Runtime bln BOOK: Access 2007 VBA Programmer's Reference ISBN: 978-0-470-04703-3 0 September 24th, 2007 01:39 PM
runtime error trying to access webservice owoade .NET Web Services 1 August 20th, 2007 02:54 PM
Access 2003 Runtime Clarence Morgan Access 1 December 3rd, 2004 01:23 AM
creating access runtime versions Loralee Access VBA 7 September 2nd, 2004 10:26 PM





Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright (c) 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.