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BOOK: Beginning C# 3.0 : An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming ISBN: 978-0-470-26129-3
This is the forum to discuss the Wrox book Beginning C# 3.0 : An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming by Jack Purdum; ISBN: 9780470261293
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Old February 4th, 2010, 09:51 AM
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Default Extra Practise

Hi,
I have just finished working through this book and I found it excellent in every way!

I want to continue to practise what I have learnt in the book and was wondering if there are practise projects out there to use?

As a teacher / lecturer I was wondering if Dr Purdum has old assignments from previous old courses that could be made avail to practise what we lean from the book. Or if anyone could let me know of any sites that do this ?

Thanks very much
 
Old February 4th, 2010, 04:11 PM
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I'm still working through the book but I would just think of something to build and build it, perhaps look through the object browser and find things that you don't know about and then find a way to use them?

I like trying to do things with APIs like twitter & facebook etc as they have a practical relevance to me (I find this helps my motivation).

Also check out some .NET blogs and then follow some of the tutorials they have etc?

A few sites with cool things to do on:

http://blogs.msdn.com/coding4fun/default.aspx
http://www.codeproject.com/index.aspx

Hope that is some help to you.
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Old February 5th, 2010, 10:33 AM
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Default Programming Exercises

Hi Paul:

First, thanks for the kind words about the book...they are appreciated.

As far as places to look, Will had some good ideas. The Code Project that he mentions is a great site for looking at OPC (Other Peoples' Code). What I would do is read some of the titles of different projects, pick one that suits your interests, and design (i.e., do The Five Program Steps) and code it yourself. Once done, go back and compare your code to the one published on the site and ask yourself whose design is better and why. That's a great way to learn by standing on the shoulders of others.

The key is to find something that interests you and then design it from the ground up. It's really good practice to actually use pen and paper to write down the design rather than shoot-from-the-hip coding. Use sideways refinement as part of the Five Steps and I think you'll find you write better (i.e., more maintainable) code that way.

One of my interests is in amateur (ham) radio. I've been licensed since 1953 but my Morse code speed sucks, so I wrote a program that allows me to read a text file (or manually enter text from the keyboard) into a textbox, select the pitch of the code tone, set the code speed, and then translate the text into Morse code. It's really helped me get back up to speed. This is something that I was interested in, so I wrote the code. I know there are probably a hundred existing programs out there that would do the same thing, but I had a blast writing it.

Pick a small project, design it, code it, and have fun with it! I wish you all the success in the world!
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Old August 5th, 2010, 08:54 AM
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Default Just want to say Thank You!

Just wanted to post ( in case Dr Purdum is still reading )

I have just had an application that I have written at work accepted to be used and distributed internally by the client my company is contracted for.

As you said I took a subject that i know ( my work) and designed an application that lets operational managers see a realtime snapshot of the operation. I just wanted to say that this would not of been possible without reading your book. As I raved about then and still do to anyone who expresses an intrest in C#. It was a real turning point for me in my understanding C# and OOP. I just wanted to say a big THANK YOU!

Im still consistanly googling away at home (where i do my coding as im paid as a unix sys admin ) and I still look at what I have written and think there must be a more elegant way of writing it but it is all underpinned by the 5 steps and what I learnt in this book

PS: if you could point me in direction of good intermediate OOP books and I want to add reporting into my app but Printing seems a nightmare so any good books or tips would be greatly appreciated :D
 
Old August 5th, 2010, 09:36 AM
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Default Printing

Hi Paul:

Thanks for the kind words about the book. It's not often that someone takes the time to say something nice...again, thanks.

As to an intermediate OOP book, I tried to find one I really liked while I was teaching at Purdue, and I couldn't find one I was happy with. I think the reason is because of the way I think about OOP...it's a little different than how most people think about it. Rather than buy a book (as I still am not aware of a really good one) on advanced concepts of OOP, I would concentrate on whatever element of OOP that most interests you (e.g., perhaps inheiritance, delegates, etc.) and then just Google it to death. That's usually what I do when I want more info on a subject. Eventually, I almost always find something useful.

I screwed up on printing in my book...there is none! Not good, and I wasn't even aware that I left it out. My bad. Again, Google is a starting place and I also often check the Code Project (codeproject.com) as they have a ton of code on hundreds of different topics. Also, you might read: http://www.devarticles.com/c/a/C-Sha...Using-C-sharp/ as a starting point. Finally, the Microsoft documentation on printing in C# is pretty good, too.

I hope this helps...
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Old August 5th, 2010, 09:47 AM
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Thanks for getting back so quickly
And as always your advice is always welcome and gratefuly received. I will check out the link when I get home.
 
Old August 6th, 2010, 06:51 AM
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Default Practice exercise

One of my homework assignments that was kinda popular was to write code that would simulate a TV remote. Most of my students used a Groupbox in a rectangular shape to hold the "buttons" and separate Picturebox to simulate the TV. When the Channel button on the remote was activated, the JPEG images would change in the Picture box. Some students even temporarily displayed a number on top of the image to show the channel! The remote had to have an On-Off button, a channel button, and a volume control. Most of the students used a label below the Picturebox to show the volume changing. BTW, if you use a fixed font (see page 160-61) for the lable and set the background color to red and have a button click display blank spaces in the label, you have a pretty simple, yet visual, volume control. Think about it...

Also, before you write any code, at least mentally walk through the Five Program Steps to design the program. It always pays off to do so.
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Old August 7th, 2010, 04:28 PM
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You have some pretty good assignment ideas have you considered making these tasks publicly available or perhaps doing one of the wrox ebook things? I think it would be pretty interesting.
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Old August 8th, 2010, 08:06 AM
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Default Assignments

No, I really haven't considered it. As it turns out, writing books is no longer what it used to be. The publisher now has a staff who do nothing but search the Internet for illegal sites that are distributing their books in electronic form. So far, they've shut down over 20,000 sites! However, they just pop up again under another name. As a result, books sales are really hurting and authors don't get the revenues they would otherwise. Even though my current book has fairly good reviews, I haven't even earned enough from sales since 2008 to pay back my advance ($10K). Indeed, according to my royalty statements, this is the worst book I've ever written! Considering it took almost a year of fultime work to write it, making that amount per year doesn't keep the wolves away. I'd rather do things on this blog for free than give the prirates another work to copy. It's too bad, really, as I enjoy writing and would like to finish an intermediate book I have started. Probably not going to happen...sorry...
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