Wrox Programmer Forums
Go Back   Wrox Programmer Forums > C# and C > C# 2005 > C# 2005
|
C# 2005 For discussion of Visual C# 2005.
Welcome to the p2p.wrox.com Forums.

You are currently viewing the C# 2005 section of the Wrox Programmer to Programmer discussions. This is a community of software programmers and website developers including Wrox book authors and readers. New member registration was closed in 2019. New posts were shut off and the site was archived into this static format as of October 1, 2020. If you require technical support for a Wrox book please contact http://hub.wiley.com
 
Old March 26th, 2008, 04:57 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 133
Thanks: 15
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via ICQ to iceman90289 Send a message via AIM to iceman90289
Default how do i get a job as a programmer while in H.S.?

i am not sure where to post this, i had a post similar to this but different. I want to know if anyone out there has ever heard of a person still in high school that is writting programs for money? i would love to do that and i could care less what the application is as long as i get paid to do it. does anyone have any idea what i should do or where i should look? i have checked google, monster.com, ifreelance.com, and several others, and i am just out of luck. please let me know if what i am looking for even exist. i am capable of writting programs, i have made my own game, my own math problem solver for geometry... i really think i can make money here, maybe not 71k per year or more but thats fine, who makes that kind of money in High School? i just want to be able to have people pay me for making them what ever software application they want me to. and if i have trouble i have this website here to assist me which is terrific. Any questions i ever had were answered here. Please reply if you think you could help me out.

 
Old March 26th, 2008, 05:55 PM
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,104
Thanks: 1
Thanked 64 Times in 64 Posts
Send a message via AIM to dparsons
Default

Hmm. Pardon the tone of this post as it is not meant to be derogatory. Yes it is quite possible for a High Schooler to become a profitable programmer, however they are more the exception than the rule. You say that you want a job which is fantastic but people posting job openings here is about as rare as an igloo in the middle of the Sahara.

You say you can write programs, ok, that is a pretty broad gernalization even more broad when you consider the multitude of programming languages that exsist in the world. So the languages and types of programs that you target would help further your post for clarity.

Anyway. Without any formal experience or training (and I am making a broad generalization here) you are going to be hard pressed to find a company that is going to hire you straight off the street to fill a programming role. The reason being is that most US employers require some form of CS degree or an equivelant amount of real world experience in lieu of a degree.

-Doug

================================================== =========
Read this if you want to know how to get a correct reply for your question:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
================================================== =========
.: Wrox Technical Editor / Author :.
Wrox Books 24 x 7
================================================== =========
 
Old March 26th, 2008, 08:20 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 133
Thanks: 15
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via ICQ to iceman90289 Send a message via AIM to iceman90289
Default

not that im trying to cheat and cut corners, what experience might you be refering too? I have noticed that most employers want a CS Degree but there are a few that dont, and the ones that dont have a job for languages i dont know, a city i do not live in... so yeah... i dont know, i may just keep looking... in the mean time i may just make my C++ and C# skills better, websites and the internet seem to be what is dominating this field. Everyone wants a website. Does C++ make websites too? or is C# the only one of the two that is capable of doing websites?

 
Old March 26th, 2008, 10:23 PM
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,104
Thanks: 1
Thanked 64 Times in 64 Posts
Send a message via AIM to dparsons
Default

Job experience. The fact of the matter is the best you could hope to do while in High School is probably land an intern job making somewhere between minimum wage and maybe 10 bucks an hour...if you are even paid at all. (Please realize I am speaking based on my locale so this is average for the area i live in)

The agencies that don't require some form of degree most certainly have some sort of Years of Experience requirement as most places won't, and pardon the phrase, hire Average Joe off the street to fill a programming role. I don't want to seem negative and I am not saying that you couldn't get a programming job straight out of high school all I am saying is that your chances of doing so are quite low.

My advice to you would be to cold canvas some places in your area and see if the IS department is hiring interns...even if its unpaid its experience that can work in your favor since you can put it on your resume! =] Think small and if a programming job happens to fall into your lap that kudos to you.

Lastly, with regard to C++ and C#. C# and VB.NET are the 2 dominat languages of the web on the Microsoft side and straight out of the box Visual Studio 2K5 only supports development under these 2 languages. C++ on the other hand, your looking at low level systems development ISAPI filters, device drivers, etc. There are markets for both.

Personally I prefer web development over systems development and that is how I have made my living for the past several years and it pays relatively well to boot.

Granted these are my opinions and should be taken as such but it should give you some food for thought none the less.

-Doug

================================================== =========
Read this if you want to know how to get a correct reply for your question:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
================================================== =========
.: Wrox Technical Editor / Author :.
Wrox Books 24 x 7
================================================== =========
 
Old March 27th, 2008, 12:23 AM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 133
Thanks: 15
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via ICQ to iceman90289 Send a message via AIM to iceman90289
Default

Thank you so much. you have been very helpful, one more question, how can someone work for free?

all and all, at the moment i would not mind working for 10 dollars an hour, its just my first job. :)

Im going to look into it

for anyone else reading this that have their oppinion please share it, i would like to get multiple opinions on most things i want to know about.

thanks again dparsons

 
Old March 27th, 2008, 07:23 AM
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,104
Thanks: 1
Thanked 64 Times in 64 Posts
Send a message via AIM to dparsons
Default

There are two types of internships, those that are paid and those that aren't. Companies do not necessarily have to pay interns because you are not actually employed for that company, you are there in an academic role to learn. This normally involves shadowing someone that is currently in the profession you are seeking to enter.

With this type of intership it is normally linked to a some form of academic training, for example individuals who go to a broadcasting school normally need to do an internship at a radio or TV station for a set number of hours as part of their degree requirement.

Now I don't want to over glamorize being an intern because its the lowest of the low as far as the totem pole goes and depending on who you have been assigned to shadow you may be fetching more coffee than slinging lines of code but alot of that depends oh how you got the internship and who you have been assigned to shadow with.

Good luck!
-Doug

================================================== =========
Read this if you want to know how to get a correct reply for your question:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
================================================== =========
.: Wrox Technical Editor / Author :.
Wrox Books 24 x 7
================================================== =========
 
Old March 27th, 2008, 12:58 PM
planoie's Avatar
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 5,407
Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 16 Posts
Default

David,

My recommendation is that you find a good computer science post secondary program. If you want to make the big bucks in IT you'll largely benefit from getting a degree. I've learned that the focus of the degree isn't even necessarily important. I have worked with some very good programmers who have degrees in music, social sciences and leisure management. I have also worked with crummy programmers who have degrees in computer science. Industry targeted education is definitely helpful but often a company just wants to see that you completed a degree program because it is demonstrative of the ability to follow through.

On the flip side, traditional education isn't everything. I went to college and studied computer science, but never finished my degree. Despite this, if I may toot my own horn for a second, I consider myself to have better technical skills than many of the people I have worked with. I believe strongly that this is the result of the desire to learn, ability to be self-educating, general problem solving skills and to some extent the motivation and need to prove myself to others due to the lack of the degree. I can't walk into an organization and expect immediate respect by flashing a degree around. Instead, I have to have experience and display expertise that others don't have. Sometimes it's easier to get in the door with the piece of paper, but at the end of the day, the people who are "smart and get things done" will prevail.

You need to find a good balance of these two. Definitely pursue a formal education. There is no doubt that what you'll learn will be helpful in many ways. I wish I'd learned a bit more theory (mine was a more practical, hands -on training). But the ultimate key to success is to just do it. Work with the current technologies and start playing with the new ones. See if you can find an internship (regardless of the pay). My first job out of college was at the company that sponsored my non-paying internship. Less than 2 months after I started full time they sent me alone on site to do a system installation and startup. I was mildly terrified, but I did my job and didn't look back.

In the end it comes down to the ability to learn and adapt. The right employer (and the one you ultimately enjoy working for) is one that recognizes not what you are currently capable of, but what you will be capable of tomorrow. I was fortunate to interview with a manager that recognized my problem solving skills and experience in adaptability. At the time I had hardly any practical skill with the technologies they were using. But they hired me anyway. During the time I was there I worked hard to teach myself what I needed to do the job at hand. Eventually my skills exceeded my senior co-workers and I had to move on to bigger things.

Yes, you need some fundamental knowledge of the industry you work in (i.e. programming), but whether you use java, C#, ruby, PHP, or any other language, the fundamentals apply and you can learn another one. Show the people you can adapt, can take initiative and that you are eager to learn and you'll do alright. Southern California should have plenty of opportunities for you.

-Peter
peterlanoie.blog
 
Old March 27th, 2008, 02:24 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 133
Thanks: 15
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via ICQ to iceman90289 Send a message via AIM to iceman90289
Default

thank you so much. what do you think of dDesk.com?

 
Old March 27th, 2008, 02:33 PM
Wrox Author
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 4,104
Thanks: 1
Thanked 64 Times in 64 Posts
Send a message via AIM to dparsons
Default

For what? It appears to be a parked domain.

================================================== =========
Read this if you want to know how to get a correct reply for your question:
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
================================================== =========
.: Wrox Technical Editor / Author :.
Wrox Books 24 x 7
================================================== =========
 
Old March 27th, 2008, 08:01 PM
Friend of Wrox
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 133
Thanks: 15
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Send a message via ICQ to iceman90289 Send a message via AIM to iceman90289
Default

parked domain?






Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How is the Job Market for .Net Programmer?? pushkar General .NET 1 October 1st, 2007 03:36 PM
New Programmer misty5 SQL Language 3 September 2nd, 2007 02:30 PM
Being a C++ programmer michaelbao C++ Programming 0 September 23rd, 2006 07:07 PM
certificate c++ programmer johnmontreal C++ Programming 1 November 28th, 2005 12:04 AM





Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright (c) 2020 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.